Consent and the Media at Clear Lines Festival

Angles panel discussion on Friday 1st December

Consenting to a media interview can be a wonderful opportunity to get a story heard and to move people with experiences and knowledge. But it can sometimes lead to survivors feeling triggered during or after the experience, or their story being edited in a way that they’re not happy with. How can survivors work together with journalists and broadcasters who cover these stories to ensure the published piece benefits survivors, the media, and the public?

This panel shares experiences from survivors who have worked with the media, journalists who have covered these issues and charity sector professionals who work with both activists and the media.

Curated by On Road Media, who sponsored and co-organised the 2015 Clear Lines Festival, and who work with activists and the media to promote new content and a better understanding of social issues through the Angles project.

When: Friday 1st December 2017, 4pm. Register for free tickets on Eventbrite.

Where: Rich Mix, 35 – 47 Bethnal Green Road, London E1 6LA

Panellists

Yvonne Roberts @YvonneARoberts

Yvonne Roberts is a former Chief Leader Writer of The Observer. She continues to write for the paper. She has worked for all the broadsheets and a number of magazines since the 1970s, as well as working as a reporter in current affairs television for 20 years. She is chair of trustees of the charity Women in Prison, campaigning to substantially reduce the female prison population and is pro bono editor of its quarterly magazine written by and for women affected by the criminal justice system.

She is advisor to On Road Media’s award-winning project All About Trans, supporting trans voices in the media, and a Fellow of The Young Foundation. She is working on her fifth novel.

Tazeen Ahmad @TazeenAhmad

Tazeen Ahmad is a Bafta-nominated TV reporter, presenter and writer who has worked across all the major broadcasters for over 20 years including ITN, NBC, BBC and Channel 4. An award-winning investigative reporter, a former foreign-correspondent and a regular contributor to national newspapers, she is also the author of ‘The Check-out Girl’. She regularly sits on a number of international and domestic juries including BAFTA, Royal Television Society, Rory Peck Awards and One World Media. She is also the Founding Director of EQ Matters, an emotional intelligence consultancy that works with Women in senior leadership and those moving into senior management empowering and supporting them through one-to-one coaching, team work and workshops and helping them tackle leadership challenges and fulfil potential.

She is also the Patron of two charities ‘Mosac’ and ‘Woman’s Trust’ and the co-founder of ‘The Story Project’, an education programme that uses writing to improve literacy and emotional intelligence amongst school children.

Faye White @fayecwhite 

Faye White is a print journalist at the Daily Mail, a rape survivor and a sexual assault activist. She started out in journalism as a broadcast assistant on the BBC flagship Sunday politics program The Andrew Marr Show and her work has been featured in BBC Three, Grazia Magazine, Channel 4, BuzzFeed and The Sun.

After she was raped on her year abroad in 2015, Faye waived her right to anonymity and wrote a piece titled ‘A Name To A Statistic’ for her student magazine, highlighting the importance for rape and assault survivors to be recognised as people and not just data on a screen.

In the aftermath of the attack, Faye recognised that she was not receiving adequate academic support at university when she told her department what had happened. On realising that this must happen to survivors all over the country, she started a campaign to change the Code of Practice on Extenuating Circumstances (EC) at universities to include a specific clause for rape and assault survivors. The campaign made national headlines and gained the support of ex-liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, who wrote to every Vice-Chancellor in the country urging them to change the rules off the back of the campaign.

Faye runs a website called whatwedotosurvive.com, where survivors of rape and assault can write anonymously or otherwise about their experiences with sexual violence, with a particular focus on recovery.

Emily Jacob @ReConnectedEm 

Image result for emily jacob reconnected lifeEmily Jacob is the founder of ReConnected Life, which provides coaching, and community, for survivors of rape. A survivor herself, Emily is using her skills, knowledge and experience to help women move forward from living one day at a time, and guiding them to their ReConnected Life. She is the author of ‘Desperately Hopeful’, and editor of ‘To Report or Not To Report: Survivor Testimony of the (In)Justice System’ which will be published in Spring 2018. Emily is a powerful speaker on behalf of survivors, and has been proud to speak at Reclaim the Night and Who Will Hear My Cry amongst others. She has been featured in Metro, Huffington Post, Glamour Online, Psychologies Life Labs, and appeared on BBC Breakfast, Radio 5 Live, and most recently the Channel 5 documentary RAPED: My Story, as well as featuring in a series of videos for the Independent.

John Wellington

John Wellington, 61, has been Managing Editor at The Mail on Sunday since 2000 after joining the paper as a reporter in 1986.

His first job in journalism was at the Brighton and Hove Gazette in 1978. He then worked for independent radio, BBC radio and as a freelance reporter for The Sun, News of The World, Daily Express, Sunday Express and The Times.

Nathalie McDermott (chair) @natmc 

Nathalie set up On Road Media in 2008 and she oversees a number of projects that bring about social change through collaboration with the media, including Angles: A Different Take on Sexual and Domestic Abuse and the award-winning All About Trans project which has leveraged over £5.5 million in programming in the UK media.

On Road Media is a charity that tackles social problems by improving media coverage of misrepresented groups and issues. The team delivers projects in collaboration with different communities across the UK, including trans people, migrants, and survivors of sexual abuse. They provide media training, peer support and friendly meet-ups with the media that inspire new content and fresh contacts, as well as encouraging a better understanding of people’s experiences and stories.

Register for free tickets on Eventbrite.

Take a look at the Clear Lines Festival which runs in Rich Mix London, from 1 – 3 December, and hosts a rich programme of discussion, theatre, comedy, spoken word, workshops and the arts – all looking at how we talk about sexual assault and consent.